Reykjavik, Iceland 
One of many volcanos in Iceland, which i think is Mount Hekla.  This Shield type volcano is the second largest in the world of that type, exceeded only by Mauna Loa in Hawaii.
One of many volcanos in Iceland, which i think is Mount Hekla. This Shield type volcano is the second largest in the world of that type, exceeded only by Mauna Loa in Hawaii.

...and even a rainbow along the way for us!
...and even a rainbow along the way for us!

You are looking through about 45 feet of VERY clear water, along the trail to the
You are looking through about 45 feet of VERY clear water, along the trail to the "Law Rock" at the Althing historic site in following picures.

Also near the Althing area.  Just a nice pastoral scene, if you can consider geese pastoral.
Also near the Althing area. Just a nice pastoral scene, if you can consider geese pastoral.

Law Rock, at the original site of the
Law Rock, at the original site of the "Althing". Intersting historic site. Here's info on it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Althing
Good to remember that the US didn't invent modern democratic government.

Some explanation of
Some explanation of "Law Rock".

Also near the Althing at Žingvellir, just the other side of the Law Rock, is a good look at the Mid-atlantic rift.  Icelend is split in two by it.  To the right is the North Atlantic tectonic plate, to the left is the Eurasian plate.
Also near the Althing at Žingvellir, just the other side of the Law Rock, is a good look at the Mid-atlantic rift. Icelend is split in two by it. To the right is the North Atlantic tectonic plate, to the left is the Eurasian plate.

And I couldn't reists stradling the rift at a little narrower  spot.  Let's see... looking north, so...  my right foot is in North America, my left foot is in Europe.
And I couldn't reists stradling the rift at a little narrower spot. Let's see... looking north, so... my right foot is in North America, my left foot is in Europe.

Leaving our dock on the MV Amsterdam was one of the more interesting departures I've seen in many cruises.  There was about a 35 mph wind holding us onto the dock. Even with the ship's azipods propulsion system (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Azipod) at the stern, the bow thruster was not going to push us against that much wind.   With a good sized tug with multiple lines helping pull the bow around, we executed a neat piroute to port side, with not a lot a clearance from our stern to the dock (see picture above, with rail in the picture!).  When folks on the dock saw what was going on, they all cleared off the dock, fast!
Leaving our dock on the MV Amsterdam was one of the more interesting departures I've seen in many cruises. There was about a 35 mph wind holding us onto the dock. Even with the ship's azipods propulsion system (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Azipod) at the stern, the bow thruster was not going to push us against that much wind. With a good sized tug with multiple lines helping pull the bow around, we executed a neat piroute to port side, with not a lot a clearance from our stern to the dock (see picture above, with rail in the picture!). When folks on the dock saw what was going on, they all cleared off the dock, fast!

Powered by Gallery v1 RSS